data

NOSORH Data Institute Begins This Month: Register Now!

i Sep 28th No Comments by

There is still time to register for the Fall 2018 NOSORH Rural Health Data Institute. The Rural Health Data Institute (RHDI) is a set of eight 90-minute web-based sessions designed to establish a minimum data-use skill set for those working with rural health data. The sessions are designed for those with little or no knowledge of the data use process.

RHDI starts by throwing the term “research” out the window and defining terms in a way that everybody can understand. It moves through the process of collecting your data, cleaning it up, and analyzing it in a way that makes sense. Later sessions help participants work through the steps of crafting their messaging and displaying it in a visualized way so other people can understand it too. By doing very small “homework” assignments aligned to the data use process, participants will end the RHDI with a one-page infographic fact sheet to do whatever they want with it: hang on the fridge in the break room or, better yet, disseminate it to your partners!

More information on the RHDI can be found in the program brochure, here.

Register today by going to: https://regonline.com/RDI2018.

 

Key Dates:

Registration opens: NOW

Registration closes: October 19, 2018

Access to course materials: October 24, 2018

Required introductory session: October 29, 2018

Institute starts: October 31, 2018

Institute ends: February 20, 2019

 

For more information on the Rural Health Data Institute, please contact Chris Salyers at chris.salyers@nosorh.org or (734) 881-9551.


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Promising Practice: Nevada SORH Digs Up Data on Rural and Frontier Counties

i Jul 21st No Comments by

By: Beth Blevins

County-level data—particularly for rural counties—wasn’t always readily available in Nevada. But the (and the associated Nevada Instant Atlas website) changed all that.

Now in its eighth edition, the Data Book, complied by the Nevada State Office of Rural Health (NV SORH), provides comprehensive information on all counties in the state. The data in its more than 100 tables varies from the broad—e.g., county populations—to the more specific, e.g., number of licensed physical therapists by county. Though issued only every other (odd) year, when the Nevada legislature is in session, the data is dynamic rather than static, according to Tabor Griswold, Health Services Research Analyst at the NV SORH.

“Data goes into the on our website first, then we pull it out for the Data Book,” Griswold explained. “We continually add or update new points of data to the website.” In addition, the Instant Atlas, which boasts more than 200 users each month, “is unique because it offers time trending,” she said. “When you bring it up visually, there is a bar that shows all the data going back to when we first started collecting it. When possible, the source of the online data is linked between the website and the original source.”

 

Click Image to Enlarge

Griswold said that users can also use the Nevada Instant Atlas to assess the impact of legislation over time. For example, she said, “the expansion of public nursing programs over the past decade, and changes in advance practice nursing scope of practice have led to dramatic increases in RNs and advance practice RNs, which is documented in the Atlas.”

 

The Data Book is available electronically as a PDF, as well as a limited number of hard copies. “We bring copies of the Data Book to “Rural Health Day at the Legislature” to share with members of the legislature and the governor’s staff, as well as hospital administrators attending the event,” said John Packham, Director of Health Policy Research at the NV SORH.

The first Data Book rose out of the frustration Packham experienced after he arrived at the Nevada SORH, whenever he needed to find rural data. The state was collecting data for Clark County (i.e., Las Vegas), Washoe County (i.e., Reno), “and the ‘balance of the state’,” Packham said. “But the ‘balance of the state’ was the 14 rural counties we worked with on a routine basis. Whether it was for a grant or a county commissioners’ meeting, we would have to mine existing data to try to find out what was going on at the county level.”

Putting that information into the Data Book made everything easier to access, Packham said. But it also made a compelling case for the state to begin collecting and breaking data down by county, he said, “because there were some pretty substantial variations between a healthy county and an unhealthy county—certainly on health workforce data. It also kick-started our practice of going to the 38 state licensing boards for health professions, getting their data, and breaking it out by county.”

The NV SORH has found effective use of the Instant Atlas for two purposes. “For community health needs assessments, one of our starting points is to abstract or pull out the county-level data, and package it in the form of a county-level report,” Packham said. The Nevada SORH also uses its data to help rural county commissioners who are trying to establish or convene local boards of health. “Of the 14 Nevada counties that are rural or frontier, none have local health departments—their public health services are provided through the state of Nevada,” Packham said. “But there’s been an awakening of interest among them to convene local boards of health—or at least put public health issues before their commissioners. Our office is supporting these efforts to the extent that they need data to start the discussion.”

Packham said that the Data Book is funded through a combination of staff partly supported by federal Flex funds, other types of state dollars, and pieces of grants and contracts. In other words, “funding is complicated,” he said. Since the Nevada SORH is university-based, “we train undergraduates in the data collection process and to understand data base development —that’s a win-win,” Packham said. “They’ve been really instrumental in loading and double-checking all of the new data.”

The Data Book has proven a success, used by legislators, county commissioners, and hospital administrators. Perhaps more importantly, according to Packham, it has improved the visibility of the NV SORH. “Over the 15 years we’ve been doing this, people know that this resource comes from the State Office and the School of Medicine at the University at Reno,” he said. “It’s our flagship publication. It has increased the degree that we’re the first resource that people go to, especially on workforce data.”

Does your SORH have a “Promising Practice”? We’re interested in the innovative, effective and valuable work that SORHs are doing. Contact Ashley Muninger at ashleym@nosorh.org to set up a short email or phone interview in which you can tell your story.

Rural Health Data Institute: Register by August 12!

i Jul 31st No Comments by

There is still time to register for the first Rural Health Data Institute starting on September 13, 2016! The Rural Health Data Institute is an online training opportunity designed to provide all SORH staff with a minimum data-use skill set. To accomplish this, the curriculum is designed over eight two-hour sessions meeting every other Tuesday through December 20 from 1:00 – 3:00 pm Eastern.

The eight sessions are intended to assist novice data users in identifying a question, collecting and organizing data, analyzing and interpreting data sets, selecting appropriate messaging, and developing data visualizations. Throughout the course, participants will work through each step to develop a final visualization that is relevant to their office and can be used within their state.

To kick off the Rural Health Data Institute, several SORHs will be presenting at the NOSORH Annual Meeting in Boston on September 7-8 to showcase the work being done in their states with data and data visualization. Those signed up to participate in the Rural Health Data Institute are strongly encouraged to attend this session to gain a better understanding of how data can be incorporated into their daily tasks.

Registration for the Rural Health Data Institute is open to SORHs only, but the number of seats are limited. You can register for the Rural Health Data Institute here. The deadline to register is August 12.


Back to August Branch

Rural Health Data Institute-Registration Now Open!

i Jul 1st No Comments by

NOSORH is proud to announce the launch of its first Rural Health Data Institute, which kicks off on September 13 and goes through December 20. The Rural Health Data Institute is an online training opportunity designed to provide all SORH staff with a minimum data-use skill set. To accomplish this, the curriculum is designed over eight two-hour sessions meeting every other Tuesday from 1:00 – 3:00 pm EST.

The eight sessions are intended to assist novice data users in identifying a question, collecting and organizing data, analyzing and interpreting data sets, selecting appropriate messaging and developing data visualizations. Throughout the course, participants will work through each step to develop a final visualization that is relevant to their office and can be used within their state.

Several SORHs will be presenting at the NOSORH Annual Meeting in Boston on September 7-8 to showcase the work being done in their states with data and data visualization. Institute participants are strongly encouraged to attend this session to gain a better understanding of how data can be incorporated into their daily tasks.

This Institute would not be possible without the generous work of all those who participated in the planning committee. Penny Black (WI) spearheaded this endeavor along with the assistance of Joyce Hospodar (AZ), Angie Sechler (MN) and Lara Brooks (OK). The assistance of such experts, along with those who will be presenting sessions, will ensure an excellent NOSORH institute.

Registration is now open to SORHs, but the number of seats is limited. Click here to register for the Rural Health Data Institute. The deadline to register is August 12.


Back to July Branch

Rural Health Data Institute- Save-The-Date!

i Jun 1st No Comments by

The NOSORH Rural Health Data Institute starts September 13 and registration is just around the corner! This 8-session online institute will assist SORH staff in understanding, finding, analyzing, using, and visualizing data important to rural health issues. Registration space for the first cohort will be limited and only available to SORH staff. Look for more information in your inbox within the next few weeks!


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